Nebraska.Code() Sessions tagged project management

Premortem in Agile Product Development

In product development, it is inevitable that some projects will fail. Sometimes they fail because organizations are reluctant to adopt a better development methodology or organizational bureaucracy is high; other times, projects fail because team members and stakeholders are reluctant to speak up about their reservations during the project kick-off phase.

When a project fails, Project Managers and Scrum Masters often ask themselves if there was anything they could have done to save the project from disaster. There is.

This session will focus on how product teams can better prepare to fight the battle of the unknown. We will showcase and lead attendees through the approach that local development company Proteus uses prior to each product build. Don’t miss this session. Your next project’s success or failure could depend on it.

Speakers

Jessica McMullen

Jessica McMullen

Director of Client Success, Proteus
Anh Dao Starita

Anh Dao Starita

Director of Product Delivery, Proteus

Agile 101 - Just the basics

Have you been considering adopting agile but are getting lost in terms or how to get started? Maybe you're ready to go but not sure how to approach your organization? Or even have attempted agile but it just didn't seem to help?

Come join us for a workshop designed to get you moving. We'll be discussing just what is agile and why is it different from other software lifecycles. We will introduce you to the nuts and bolts of agile so you can sound like a pro. Finally, we'll talk about what is the right approach for introducing agile into your environment.

Come prepared to learn and participate. This workshop doesn't require any experience in agile. If you're just beginning (or about to) you will fit right in. There is no technical skillset required so if you're a manager/exec, business analyst, developer, tester, etc., you'll have fun. Presented by the Lincoln Agile Community.

Speakers

Andy Harms

Andy Harms

Executive Consultant, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska
theresa krupicka

theresa krupicka

IT Scrum Master, Nelnet,Inc
Rob Nickolaus

Rob Nickolaus

Director of IT, Arbor Day Foundation
John Roby

John Roby

Project Manager, Cabela's
Keil Wilson

Keil Wilson

Consultant, Keil Consulting, Inc.

Eating the Elephant (how to get started on big projects)

You've just been handed a big project with a lot of players involved and you're looking to figure out what you have. Where do you start? Who is the expert? What needs to be delivered? When will it be done?

In this workshop, we'll show an approach that is used to gather the high-level requirements from whomever might know about them, gather consensus for who this product serves, what they can do with it, and what is important to the stakeholders. We'll walk through an iterative process for gaining an understanding of the project including assigning effort and value to individual pieces. We'll cover how to figure out what is missing and what is irrelevant.

This technique works for those both familiar and unfamiliar with agile development. It bridges the gap between technical professionals and non-technical business experts or stakeholders.

We will be covering various techniques such as silent brainstorming, clustering requirements, personas, user story maps, valuation techniques, effort estimation, and possibly some edge techniques for certain situations.

Speakers

Rob Nickolaus

Rob Nickolaus

Director of IT, Arbor Day Foundation
Jess Osborn

Jess Osborn

Business Analyst, Arbor Day Foundation

Stop Iteration Bait and Switch

Have you ever worked on an agile project where you were pressured to get something out the door? Maybe you were told “it doesn’t have to be perfect,” “this is agile,” or “we will iterate on it.” The next thing you know you have a handful of half-baked features shipped, mountains of features ahead of you, and nowhere in sight is that promised opportunity to iterate.

Agile has the good intentions of encouraging iterative and incremental development but how to accomplish that can feel far from intuitive. Without understood practices, iteration doesn’t occur and the product ends up shipping as is. In this talk I breakdown what it truly means to build a product iteratively and incrementally. I'll share how myself and colleagues have approached these problems by deconstructing a product roadmap with you and showcasing real examples from our experiences. Join me and learn how you can start iterating on your projects today.

This session is targeted not only to product owners and management, but also developers. It takes the engineers to capitalize on these approaches.

Speaker

Nicholas Tuck

Nicholas Tuck

Software Gardener, Aviture

Project Overload

With my current situation of managing 20 plus projects at a time, I have determined ways to appropriately set roles, responsibilities, and expectations to make sure things run smoothly and the projects complete successfully. I will walk through how we approach the project manager role and when not to “project manage” the teams.

Learning Objectives: * Setting expectations for managing too many projects. * A quick and simple methodology/tool to easily keep track of all projects’ current status and issues. * A service oriented perspective of the Project Management Office.

Speaker

Jeremy Suing

Jeremy Suing

Design Studio Project Manager, UNL - Raikes School