Nebraska.Code() Sessions tagged agile

Facilitation for all

A decision needs made and it's now up to you to get there. Who needs invited, what's the outcome, and how do you get there? The great thing about self-organizing teams is that they can handle events without waiting for someone else. At some point in time you will need to facilitate a meeting. Being an effective facilitator will ensure meetings are fun, productive, and respectful of everyone's time. Jess will lead you through facilitation techniques and tricks to make sure you not only have the right people in the room, but you get to your desired outcome in an efficient manner. We will look at techniques that include time boxing and utilizing a parking lot.

Speaker

Jess Osborn

Jess Osborn

Business Analyst, Arbor Day Foundation

Scrumicide - Killing Yourself the Agile Way (and how not to)

In this session, common pitfalls for agile teams are explored. Agile roles and team issues day-to-day are discussed. At the end of this session, leaners should have practical information to identify and solve common agile issues.

The following is a general outline: - Toxic product owners o Lack of Vision and Strategy o Mistrust of your team abilities o Generally does not understand or believe in the product o Trusts others more than you o Rude, belligerent and argumentative o Unqualified and uninformed o Pointing bully o Uninvolved - The Non-team Disease
o How to handle roles outside the project - Poor ceremonies o Stale Standup  No fun o Formulaic standup o Standup: Pushing forward and challenging each other o Ruh-Rohs in Retro: What to Expect When Reflecting  Same thing over and over  One size does not fit all o Feedback loops  Why agile demands them  Scrum Master Survey - Distributed Team Issues o Taking care knowing your team is different o Team time o Visuals o Showing movement - Cross-dysfunctional o No one is in charge o Social loafing o Training issues o Giving all the work to one person because they “know it”

Speaker

Nick Hershberger

Nick Hershberger

Scum Master, Manager, Fiserv

Recipe for Innovation - Beyond the Ingredients

Innovation is the holy grail of software today. Everyone wants to come out with the next disruptive technology, butwhy do some organizations struggle to reach this creative nirvanawhile others make it look so easy? To better understand this phenomenon, we'll look to the kitchen. Example: You can have all of the ingredients to make a cake, but if you mix them in a cereal bowl and put it in a meat smoker you won't be pulling out anything tasty out any time soon. This is because a recipe involves much more than just the ingredients. Software is surprisingly similar--even with talented people and great ideas you will struggle if you don't have the correct tools and environment. Let's peel back the onion and explore what really makes a team Agile and innovative!

Speaker

Eric Reichwaldt

Eric Reichwaldt

President, Shyft Solutions LLC

Retrospectives - How to improve processes and get people working together

So many business problems can be solved better just by talking to one another. The technology may be straight-forward to master, but learning how to improve processes and foster better working relationships on a team requires communication.

Learn how a simple tool like a retrospective can lead to improvements in how we approach projects, provide better solutions, and provide focus to our teams. I'll cover the basics of what a retro should (and shouldn't) address, how to use simple techniques to make them useful in a contextual way, and how you can expand them beyond your software teams.

Speaker

Rob Nickolaus

Rob Nickolaus

Director of IT, Arbor Day Foundation

What we learned from TDD (besides T and D)

During our journey to implement Test Driven Design, we chose to use TDD katas to teach the team in small, bite-sized chunks. Along the way, we learned a great deal about unit tests and how they can drive design. However, we also learned some valuable team skills and highlighted some misconceptions we had been carrying.

Come learn how TDD can highlight just how far away you team members may be from each other (code/design-wise), what causes friction on the team, how people approach problems, and what can be taught by code examinations. We'll show how TDD can highlight and cross-pollinate best practices, coding styles, modern language element usage, and even cause friction for those who may prefer to overengineer systems (and what you can do to smooth that over). Along the way, we'll cover just what exactly is a TDD kata and how you can add it to your toolbox.

Speaker

Rob Nickolaus

Rob Nickolaus

Director of IT, Arbor Day Foundation

Top 10 Development Behaviors of High Performing Teams

In Design Studio, we manage nearly 30 projects a year made up of student development teams. We want all of our projects to be successful and for all of the students to learn how to work appropriately in a development environment. One goal of our projects is to prepare developers to be successful members of software development teams by exposing them to behaviors that are associated with building and releasing high-quality software products. Therefore, we promote and require certain activities related to "good" development behaviors across all of the teams. We have a core list of 10 behaviors/activties that are required. I will go over these 10 behaviors during this session explaining what the behavior/activity is and talk about why it is important. I will also review how we evaluate teams based on these behaviors and what we are looking for with each of them.

Attendees will leave knowing the 10 required development behaviors/activities we teach to all Design Studio project teams and why we feel they are important to the success of our projects and the education of our students.

Speaker

Jeremy Suing

Jeremy Suing

Design Studio Project Manager, UNL - Raikes School

Become a Better Leader with Lego

Former Defense Secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, famously talked about, "Known knowns," "known unknowns," and "unknown unknowns." We will use Lego to demonstrate what Rummy was talking about and why understanding the five contexts of Cynefin (pronounced ku-nev-in) will help you understand situations before deciding how to best manage them. As a bonus, you will learn about teamwork, communication and chaos while building with everyone's favorite childhood toy.

Speakers

Keil Wilson

Keil Wilson

IT Enterprise Business Applications Architect, Nelnet

Personal Kanban

Join me for a quick review of the major concepts presented in Jim Benson's foundational book, Personal Kanban. We will start by reviewing the two simple rules of Personal Kanban: 1) Visualize your work, and 2) Limit your work-in-progress (WIP). Then we will cover other important topics from the book, including establishing your backlog, what is value stream (or how to organize your Kanban Board), what it means to pull work through the process, and how to embrace kaizen (a state of continual improvement). The goal is to give you enough information to get you started down the path to using Kanban to manage your own personal tasks and projects.

Speaker

Keil Wilson

Keil Wilson

IT Enterprise Business Applications Architect, Nelnet